The Odom Law Firm


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Reckless Driving Violations
A person commits the offense of reckless driving if the person drives a vehicle in willful or wanton disregard for the safety of people or property. The phrase "willful and wanton" means that the motorist showed deliberate and conscious indifference to the safety of others. The essence of reckless driving lies in the manner and circumstances of the vehicle's operation, not merely in the act of operating a vehicle. More...
Criminal Offense of Attempting to Elude
It is against the law to attempt to elude a police officer by willfully failing to stop a vehicle if the officer gives you an audible or visual signal to stop and the police officer is in uniform, prominently displaying a badge or other insignia. If a police officer is in an appropriately marked official police vehicle when he or she gives the signal stop, whether or not the officer is in uniform, the vehicle driver may not attempt to elude the officer by willfully failing to stop the vehicle. More...
Admissibility of Blood Alcohol Tests in Drunk Driving Cases
All 50 states and the District of Columbia have enacted statutes requiring a motorist arrested for drunk driving to submit to a chemical blood test. These statutes are known as "implied consent" laws. Under these laws, a motorist suspected of driving under the influence of alcohol is deemed to have consented to a chemical analysis test designed to measure blood alcohol content level. More...
Criminal Offense of Failure to Report an Accident
Most jurisdictions require a motorist to prepare and forward an accident report to the state's department of motor vehicles whenever the motorist is involved in a motor vehicle accident resulting in property damage or injury. But even before filing a report, the driver has an affirmative duty to stop, provide information, and give notice to the police. These statutes are commonly referred to as hit-and-run statutes. The information commonly required by the statutes includes the driver's name and address, the registration number of the vehicle involved in the accident, and insurance information. In the event that no person is present or able to receive this information, the driver has an affirmative duty to report the accident to the police. More...
Failure to Yield Traffic Violations
State highway statutes and local ordinances set forth violations for offenses for which violators may be arrested without arrest warrants. One such violation is the failure to yield the right-of-way. Right-of-way merely means a preference to one of two vehicles asserting the right of passage at the same place and at approximately the same time. Generally speaking, the driver of the vehicle on the left must yield the right-of-way to the vehicle on the right. Moreover, the right-of-way is not absolute as the relative speeds and positions of drivers with respect to the intersection must be considered. More...

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